Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


5 US troops killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan

11 June 2014, 08:10

Kabul - Five American troops with a special operations unit were killed by a US airstrike called in to help them after they were ambushed by the Taliban in southern Afghanistan, in one of the deadliest friendly fire incidents in nearly 14 years of war, officials said on Tuesday.

The deaths were a fresh reminder that the conflict is nowhere near over for some US troops, who will keep fighting for at least two more years.

Pentagon spokesperson Rear Admiral John Kirby said the five American troops were killed on Monday "during a security operation in southern Afghanistan".

"Investigators are looking into the likelihood that friendly fire was the cause. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of these fallen," Kirby said in a statement.

In Washington, US defence officials said the five Americans were with a special operations unit that they did not identify.

Earlier, officials had said all five were special operations-qualified troops, but later an official said their exact affiliation was unclear and one or more may have been a conventional soldier working with the special operations unit.

The deaths occurred during a joint operation of Afghan and Nato forces in the Arghandab district of southern Zabul province ahead of Saturday's presidential runoff election, said provincial police chief General Ghulam Sakhi Rooghlawanay.

After the operation was over, the troops came under attack from the Taliban and called in air support, he said.

"Unfortunately five Nato soldiers and one Afghan army officer were killed mistakenly by Nato airstrike," Rooghlawanay said.

There was no way to independently confirm Rooghlawanay's comments. The coalition would not comment and Nato headquarters in Brussels also declined to comment.

However, special operations forces often come under fire on joint operations and are responsible for calling in air support when needed. Because of constraints placed by President Hamid Karzai, such airstrikes are usually called "in extremis", when troops fear they are about to be killed.

Airstrikes have long caused tensions between the Afghan government and coalition forces, especially when they cause civilian casualties.

Airstrikes that kill coalition soldiers are far less common. One of the worst such incidents came in April 2002, when four Canadian soldiers were killed by an American F-16 jet fighter that dropped a bomb on a group of troops during a night firing exercise in southern Kandahar.

Intensified attacks

In April 2004, former National Football League player Pat Tillman was killed by coalition fire while serving in an Army Ranger unit in one of the most highly publicised cases.

One of the five American troops killed on Monday was identified as 19-year-old Aaron Toppen of Mokena, Ill., who had deployed to Afghanistan in March, a month after his father died, according to a family spokesperson. His family was suffering a "double hit" of grief, Toppen's sister, Amanda Gralewski, told the Chicago Sun-Times.

The Taliban claimed responsibility for Monday's ambush in Zabul.

A Taliban spokesperson, Qari Yousef Ahmadi, said a battle took place between foreign troops and Taliban fighters in the Arghandab district, and a "huge number" of Nato soldiers were killed or wounded in the fighting.

The insurgents have intensified attacks on Afghan and foreign forces ahead of Saturday's presidential runoff, and officials are concerned there could be more violence around the time of the vote, although the first round in April passed relatively peacefully.

Of the 30 000 or so US troops left in Afghanistan, special operations forces are among the only ones that are active on the battlefield, mentoring and advising Afghan commandos during raids.

An even smaller group that operates independently of the Nato coalition mandate, which expires at the end of the year, goes after high-value targets including the remnants of al-Qaeda. Many of those special forces are likely to remain after the end of 2014, when foreign combat troops leave the country.

Troop withdrawal

Although the US has pledged 9 800 troops will remain until the end of 2016, a bilateral security agreement allowing them to do so has yet to be signed. The two candidates vying to succeed Karzai have said they will sign the deal.

Most of those troops will be training and advising the Afghan army and police, but a small counterterrorism force will still go after high value Jihadists still in the country.

The main opposition candidate, former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah, has little love for the Taliban and is unlikely to stand in the way of such operations. The other contender, former finance minister and Karzai adviser Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai, may be more reticent.

Separately, a Nato statement said a service member died on Monday as a result of a non-battle injury in eastern Afghanistan.

The deaths bring to 36 the number of Nato soldiers killed so far this year in Afghanistan, with eight service members killed in June.

Casualties have been falling in the US-led military coalition as its forces pull back to allow the Afghan army and police to fight the Taliban insurgency. All combat troops are scheduled to be withdrawn from the country by the end of this year.

Violence against Afghans, however, has continued unabated.

Insurgents attacked two vehicles carrying civilian de-miners in eastern Logar province, killing eight and wounding three, said provincial spokesperson Din Mohammad Darwesh.

In eastern Ghazni province, insurgents kidnapped 33 university instructors who were travelling to Kabul for a seminar.

 Kandahar provincial spokesperson Dawa Khan Menapal said the 33 were taken by a large group of insurgents and there was no word on their fate. He said all were from the southern province.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Submitted by
Victor Tinto
Leave ODM if you are unhappy, Rai...

Leave ODM if you are not happy, Raila Odinga tells Senator. Read more...

Submitted by
Victor Tinto
Former Assistant Minister joins J...

A former Assistant Minister has quit PNU and joined the Jubilee Party. Read more...

Submitted by
Victor Tinto
DP Ruto intervenes as Kerio Valle...

DP William Ruto will visit Kerio Valley to try solve never-ending clashes between local residents. Read more...

Submitted by
Wilson Ochieng
ODM MP chased down by angry Kibra...

Kibra MP Ken Okoth had a hard time in his constituency after angry youth pelted him with stones. Read more...

Submitted by
Wilson Ochieng
Prepare for DP Ruto fight in 2022...

An MP has warned that the Kalenjin Community will not stand back and watch as DP Ruto is duped ahead of the 2022 polls. Read more...

Submitted by
William Korir
Be careful who you deal with, DP ...

Watch out for your political future, DP William Ruto has been warned. Read more...