Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.

 

'Tribes' emerging on Twitter

15 March 2013, 13:53

A project led by scientists from Royal Holloway University in collaboration with Princeton University, has found evidence of how people form into tribe-like communities on social network sites such as Twitter.

In a paper published in EPJ Data Science, they found that these communities have a common character, occupation or interest and have developed their own distinctive languages.

"This means that by looking at the language someone uses, it is possible to predict which community he or she is likely to belong to, with up to 80% accuracy," said Dr John Bryden from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway.

"We searched for unusual words that are used a lot by one community, but relatively infrequently by the others. For example, one community often mentioned Justin Bieber, while another talked about President Obama."

Different communities have different ‘languages’

Professor Vincent Jansen from Royal Holloway added: "Interestingly, just as people have varying regional accents, we also found that communities would misspell words in different ways. The Justin Bieber fans have a habit of ending words in 'ee', as in 'pleasee', while school teachers tend to use long words."

The team produced a map of the communities showing how they have vocations, politics, ethnicities and hobbies in common. In order to do this, they focused on the sending of publicly available messages via Twitter, which meant that they could record conversations between two or many participants.

To group these users into communities, they turned to cutting-edge algorithms from physics and network science. The algorithms worked by looking for individuals that tend to send messages to other members of the same community.

Dr Bryden then suggested analysing the language use of these discovered communities.

Dr Sebastian Funk from Princeton University said: "When we started to apply John's ideas, surprising groups started to emerge that we weren't expecting. One 'anipals' group was interested in hosting parties to raise funds for animal welfare, while another was a fascinating growing community interested in the concept of gratitude."

 
EurekAlert

NEXT ON NEWS24 KENYAX

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Add your comment
Comment 0 characters remaining

Read more from our Users

Submitted by
Eugene Odanga
Famous comedian a 'dead beat fath...

A famous local comedian has been named and shamed as a 'dead beat father'. Find out who. Read more...

Submitted by
Shakila Alivitsa
Four tacky ways to decline free d...

Free drinks from strangers can be positive or negative. Should ladies accept them? Here are ways not to. Read more...

Submitted by
Nechesa Chemoi
Uganda’s mobile financial service...

IFC has announced an advisory services agreement, valued at $3.9 million, with Airtel Uganda to expand access to mobile financial services to strengthen financial inclusion. Read more...

Submitted by
Victor Tinto
Saved from Westgate death by oil ...

The Westgate Mall incident a year ago this week was a chilling experience to many, including survivors who have not got over the incident. Read more...

Submitted by
Nechesa Chemoi
KES 88,000 raised to help Sierra ...

Airtel Kenya staff have raised KES 88,000 to help Sierra Leone fight the deadly Ebola virus.  Read more...

Submitted by
Shakila Alivitsa
Questions you should never ask yo...

There are things you should never ask your man. Never. Read more...