Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Child behavioral problems linked to bedtimes

17 October 2013, 11:13

Children who go to to bed at irregular hours are more likely to have behavioral problems, according to a study published Monday.

The research, which appeared in the US journal Pediatrics, found that lifelong problems could result from erratic childhood bedtimes, but that the effects could be reversed with implementation of a schedule.

"Not having fixed bedtimes, accompanied by a constant sense of flux, induces a state of body and mind akin to jet lag," said Yvonne Kelly of the University College London.

Inconsistent bedtimes can disrupt natural body rhythms and cause sleep deprivation, impairing brain development and the ability to regulate some behaviors, the research showed.

"We know that early child development has profound influences on health and wellbeing across the life course," Kelly said.

The British study analyzed the bedtime data of more than 10,000 children of ages three, five and seven, taking into account their behavioral problems as reported by teachers and mothers.

Hyperactivity, conduct issues, problems with peers and emotional difficulties were some of the conditions that were worse for children with irregular bedtimes.

"One way to try and prevent this would be for health care providers to check for sleep disruptions as part of routine health care visits," Kelly said.

Problems, however, only became more severe as children progressed through childhood. And those who adopted a more stable bedtime schedule demonstrated clear improvements in behavior.

Three-year-olds were the most likely to go to bed at irregular hours, with one in five going to sleep at erratic times.

Children with varying bedtimes or who went to bed after 9 pm were more likely to be from a socially disadvantaged background, a factor the study took into account.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Submitted by
Wilson Ochieng
DP Ruto accuses Raila of selling ...

DP Wiliam Ruto has castigated Raila Odinga for seeking western support to fund his 2017 election bid. Read more...

Submitted by
William Korir
Peter Kenneth announces Uhuru 201...

Peter Kenneth has announced that he will support President Uhuru Kenyatta in the 2017 elections. Read more...

Submitted by
Wilon Ochieng
Labour Party to dump both Jubilee...

The Labour Party of Kenya is likely to avoid supportoing both the CORD and Jubilee factions during the 2017 General Elections. Read more...

Submitted by
William Korir
Ukambani MP quits Jubilee, to run...

An Ukambani MP has quit the Jubilee Party, citing voter apathy as his reason behind leaving the ruling coalition. Read more...

Submitted by
Victor Tinto
Government launches probe into Po...

The government has launched an inquiry into the circumstances that could have led to two National Police Service helicopter accidents in August and September this year. Read more...

Submitted by
Wilwon Ochieng
Deputy Governor's ally found with...

The EACC has recovered KES 2 million in fake currency from a close ally of Deputy Governor for Tharaka Nithi Eliud Mati. Read more...